THE ILLINOIS SEPARATION

Welcome to our young grassroots operation in search of a new and better Illinois.



The Illinois Separation

The Petition

  

  

How to fill out a petition in Illinois.

• After you download your petition, and you go to print your copies, you will need to set your printer to Legal Format. This will require you to have 8.5 by 14 paper stock. Your standard 8.5x11 paper will NOT work for this. 

 • Print your Petition, take a picture of it, and send it to the Illinois Separation so that we may confirm that it is correct. (We do not want anyone going through all the effort to collect signatures only to have the petition printed in the wrong size.)

• If you wish to save time, you can fill in the county name on your document on the computer, before printing, or it can be written in by hand so long as it is printed and legible. 

• You may fill out all your information on the petition, excluding your signature and the Notary information. It is very important that you DO NOT SIGN the petition until in the presence of a Notary. 

• At the very bottom of the petition is a section for numbering the petition. Leave this section blank. 

• Each petition must be signed in front of a Notary by the person who collected the signatures. All signatures on an individual sheet must be collected by the same person, and in person. You will not be able to leave the petition at a location to be picked up later.  • We are getting quite a few notary’s stepping up willing to donate their time for us, and we will be working with them to meet up with petitioners.

• All individuals that sign a petition must be a registered voter in the State of Illinois, and for the county on which sheet they are signing for the signature to be considered valid. If they say they aren’t registered but would like to sign, please encourage them to register to vote, and followup with them after they have done so.

• For each signature to be considered valid, all information must be filled out for the signer, and the information must be legible. Incomplete or illegible information will be considered invalid, and the signature may be thrown out. 

• This will be a large effort that will require us to build networks, communicate with each other, and stay dedicated through the process. Your efforts are appreciated as we fight to reclaim our state from one city.  

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Funding Loyalty Act

 

The Funding Loyalty Act

1. This Act may be cited as the Funding Loyalty Act.

2. With respect to the State of Illinois, the State of California, and the State of Oregon, it shall be the case that if any of the said states, or an agency or political subdivision thereof, shall receive a payment from the Treasury of the United States in a manner not prohibited by state law on or after July 1, 2019, it shall be thereby deemed conclusive that the receipt of said payment shall be treated for all purposes as the granting of consent by the legislature of that state for the counties thereof to form a new state and to petition the President of the United States for admission to the Union as such, as provided for in this Act.

a. An attempt by any of the said states or the legislature thereof to qualify, modify, retract, or disavow such consent shall be deemed null and void for all purposes.

b. The aforesaid consent of the legislature of a state shall extend to allowing any township or municipality within a county which does not choose to join in a petition for the admission of a new state to the Union, as provided for in this Act, to decide to become part of the new state upon the admission of the new state to the Union; provided, that said decision must be made within one year of the admission of the new state to the Union, and provided further that said decision may be made prior to the admission of the new state to the Union.

c. The consent of Congress provided for herein for the admission of a new state to the Union shall be qualified, in that the legislature of a new state so admitted shall be deemed to have granted its consent for any township or municipality within a county of the new state to decide to return to being part of the original state from which the new state had been taken, if the law of the original state shall so allow; provided, that said decision must be made within one year of the admission of the new state to the Union.

i. Said decision may be made prior to the admission of the new state to the Union, in which case the township or municipality so deciding shall not become part of the new state.

d. The budget of the Office of Counsel to the President shall be increased by one hundred thousand dollars, which money shall be used to assist in advising the President pertaining to the application of this Act.

i. Nothing in this Act shall be construed to limit the Office of Counsel to the President from using other funds appropriated for that Office in advising the President pertaining to the application of this Act.

3. This Act constitutes the consent of Congress for the admission to the Union of one new state, pursuant to the provisions of this Act, from each of the states listed in Paragraph 2.

4. Counties within each of the states specified in Paragraph 2 which shall seek to petition for admission to the Union as a new state pursuant to this Act shall give 30 days’ public notice of their intent to do so. Each county government may give such notice before or after passage of a popular referendum within the county authorizing the county government to submit said petition, provided that said referendum has in fact won approval by the people of the county by the time the petition is submitted to the President.

5. Upon receipt of said petition for admission to the Union from the governing bodies of counties within a state referred to in Paragraph 2, the President shall give 14 days’ notice to each of the counties of any such state other than those counties which have submitted that petition that the President has received said petition. 

a. If, after the expiration of said 14 days’ notice, no county of a state from which such a petition has been received shall have declared to the President a desire to be added as a signatory to the petition, the President shall deem the petition to be complete and final.

b. If the governments of any counties within such state which have not joined in submitting said petition declare to the President their desire to be made signatories to the petition prior to the expiration of the 14 days’ notice, then following the expiration of the 14 days’ notice, the President shall give the counties which submitted said petition and the counties which seek to be added as signatories to the petition 10 days’ notice for them to declare whether they shall unanimously agree to become signatories of the petition jointly. 

c. If the said counties unanimously agree to become signatories of the petition jointly, the President shall consider the petition to be from said counties jointly, and the President shall then deem the petition to be complete and final.

d. If said counties do not unanimously agree to become signatories of the petition jointly, the President shall consider which group of counties, if any, would provide the greatest protection for the enforcement of the immigration law of the United States under state law upon their admission to the Union as a new state, including the potential hazard that said law could be repealed after admission to the Union as a new state, and whether sufficient enforcement mechanisms would exist within the new state for ensuring that the enforcement of the immigration law of the United States will be assured if the government of the new state should decide upon a policy of non-enforcement of said protections under state law. 

i. Except as provided for herein, if the President shall find that either the group of counties which originally submitted the petition or a group of counties which seek to be added as signatories to the petition pursuant to this Act would provide by state law for greater protection of the enforcement of the immigration law of the United States than the remaining said counties would, the President shall consider the petition only from those counties which would provide for said greater protection, and shall then deem the petition to be complete and final.

ii. Except as provided for herein, if the President shall find that neither group of said counties would demonstrably provide by state law for greater protection of the enforcement of the immigration law of the United States, the President shall consider the petition only from the counties which originally submitted said petition, and shall then deem the petition to be complete and final.

6. Upon finding that said petition is complete and final, the President shall ascertain the following:

a.  whether the legislature of the state in which the petitioning counties are located has consented to allowing the petitioning counties to be admitted to the Union as a new state, whether such consent has been deemed to have been given as provided for in this Act, or otherwise; and, 

b. whether the counties submitting the petition have a population in the aggregate of 30,000 persons or more; and,

c. whether the petitioning counties shall have established for the new state by popular referendum, approved within each county, a constitution, statutes, regulations, and case law for the governing of the new state with a republican form of government upon its admission to the Union; and,

d. whether the constitution and other laws of the new state to be formed by the petitioning counties shall have adequate safeguards to prevent the law of the new state from constituting or facilitating interference with the immigration law of the United States, or from condoning such by any political subdivision thereof.

e. whether said safeguards of the new state, as referred to in part d above, would likely be greater than whatever such safeguards might already be in place in the law of the state from which the new state would be created.

7. If, after due investigation, the President is unable to find that one or more of the inquiries referred to in Paragraph 6 should be answered in the affirmative, the President shall give said petitioning counties 90 days’ notice to address the reason or reasons as to why the President was unable to find that said inquiry or inquiries could not be answered in the affirmative, and to remedy the same.

a. If the President subsequently finds that one or more of the inquiries referred to in Paragraph 6 still cannot be answered in the affirmative after the expiration of said 90 days’ notice, the President shall declare said petition to be void. A county or counties which were signatories to such petition may be signatories to a new petition following any declaration that a petition to which the county or counties had been signatories has been declared void.

8. Upon finding, pursuant to this Act, that the each of the inquiries referred to in Paragraph 6 has been answered in the affirmative, notwithstanding any previous finding that one or more of the inquiries had not been answered in the affirmative, the President, by executive order, shall recognize the statehood of the petitioning counties and shall admit said new state to the Union. 

9. Nothing in this Act shall be construed to limit the right of the people of any state or territory of the United States from petitioning Congress for consent for the admission of a new state to the Union in a manner not covered by this Act.

10. Any case brought with respect to any application of this Act may only be brought as provided for under this Act, and except as otherwise provided herein, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia shall have exclusive jurisdiction to hear and decide cases brought under this Act, and venue shall lie in that forum alone.

a. In any said case, the United States, the President of the United States in the official capacity thereof, and each state specified in Paragraph 2 of this Act shall be parties to the suit.

i. The initial Complaint in any said case may be filed only by one or more of the states specified in Paragraph 2 of this Act.

ii. Joinder of parties other than those specified herein is not favored, and the Court shall not allow such joinder in the absence of a clear showing that a decision not to allow such joinder would work a manifest injustice.

b. A case brought under this Act shall be deemed ripe for review, and each state specified in Paragraph 2 of this Act shall have standing to bring suit to challenge the validity of this Act upon this Act becoming law without respect to the effective date thereof.

i. The District Court shall not have jurisdiction to hear or decide cases challenging the validity of this Act or its application which may be brought more than 10 days after this Act becomes law, without respect to the effective date thereof. 

c.  All cases brought within said 10 day period shall be consolidated into one case.

d.  Following the aforesaid 10 day period, the District Court shall empanel a three-judge court to hear a case brought under this Act.

e. The District Court shall hear and shall proceed to judgment in an expeditious manner in any case brought under this Act.

i. A Plaintiff in said case shall have the right to amend the Complaint once within seven days of the filing of the original Complaint, and by leave of the Court thereafter; provided, that where leave of the Court to amend the Complaint is required, said leave is not favored, and shall be granted only upon a clear showing that a decision not to grant leave of the Court to amend the Complaint would work a manifest injustice.

ii. In considering a motion for leave to amend the Complaint where leave of the Court may be required, the Court shall include in its consideration of the motion the amount of time since this Act had been introduced in Congress, particularly in light of the requirement of this Act that the case be brought to judgment expeditiously.

f. No rehearing by the District Court shall be allowed, and the United States Court of Appeals shall not have jurisdiction to hear an appeal therefrom.

g. A party aggrieved by a final judgment of the District Court in a case brought under this Act shall have the right to appeal such judgment to the Supreme Court of the United States, which shall hear and decide the case expeditiously.

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Broken Oaths

Constitution of the State of Illinois

ARTICLE VIII

FINANCE

SECTION 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS
   (a)  Public funds, property or credit shall be used only
for public purposes.
   (b)  The State, units of local government and school
districts shall incur obligations for payment or make
payments from public funds only as authorized by law or
ordinance.
   (c)  Reports and records of the obligation, receipt and
use of public funds of the State, units of local government
and school districts are public records available for
inspection by the public according to law.
(Source: Illinois Constitution.)


SECTION 2. STATE FINANCE
   (a)  The Governor shall prepare and submit to the General
Assembly, at a time prescribed by law, a State budget for the
ensuing fiscal year. The budget shall set forth the estimated
balance of funds available for appropriation at the beginning
of the fiscal year, the estimated receipts, and a plan for
expenditures and obligations during the fiscal year of every
department, authority, public corporation and quasi-public
corporation of the State, every State college and university,
and every other public agency created by the State, but not
of units of local government or school districts. The budget
shall also set forth the indebtedness and contingent
liabilities of the State and such other information as may be
required by law. Proposed expenditures shall not exceed funds
estimated to be available for the fiscal year as shown in the
budget.
   (b)  The General Assembly by law shall make
appropriations for all expenditures of public funds by the
State. Appropriations for a fiscal year shall not exceed
funds estimated by the General Assembly to be available
during that year.
(Source: Illinois Constitution.)


SECTION 3. STATE AUDIT AND AUDITOR GENERAL
   (a)  The General Assembly shall provide by law for the
audit of the obligation, receipt and use of public funds of
the State. The General Assembly, by a vote of three-fifths of
the members elected to each house, shall appoint an Auditor
General and may remove him for cause by a similar vote. The
Auditor General shall serve for a term of ten years. His
compensation shall be established by law and shall not be
diminished, but may be increased, to take effect during his
term.
   (b)  The Auditor General shall conduct the audit of
public funds of the State. He shall make additional reports
and investigations as directed by the General Assembly. He
shall report his findings and recommendations to the General
Assembly and to the Governor.
(Source: Illinois Constitution.)


SECTION 4. SYSTEMS OF ACCOUNTING, AUDITING AND REPORTING
   The General Assembly by law shall provide systems of
accounting, auditing and reporting of the obligation, receipt
and use of public funds. These systems shall be used by all
units of local government and school districts.
(Source: Illinois Constitution.

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The Illinois Separation

Illinoisans seeking an opportunity to govern ourselves away from the corrupt politicians in the Chicago area that impose outrageous laws that oppress our state and federal constitutions. They themselves have violated our state constitution by fumbling our budget for years now. As tax paying citizens we have the right to fire them from their positions for neglect and treason. There is no sunshine ahead in the Illinois financial weather.